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Tricky Expressions: Is it One Word or Two?

by South University
June 11, 2012

Whether words are misused or are not words at all, we've made an effort to highlight them. Today, we’ll dive into some common expressions and discover if one word or two should be used.

  • After All/Afterall – In this case, only “after all” is correct. It makes sense that “afterall” would pop up from time to time though. We’re all busy and looking for ways to simplify our lives, shortening words and combining them. In this case, however, we should stick with “after all.”
  • All Right/Alright – This pairing is a bit more complicated than the previous one. Traditionally, “all right” is the correct usage and “alright” is incorrect, but as we mentioned in a previous blog post , the English language is constantly evolving, and “alright” is slowly gaining acceptance for everyday use.
  • Every Day/Everyday – Speaking of “everyday,” we bring you our third pairing. In this case, both are words but have different meanings. Many people mistakenly write “everyday” when they really mean “every day.” This sentence gives us the correct usage for both: Jane likes to eat oatmeal for breakfast every day; it has become an important part of her everyday routine.
  • Any One/Anyone – Here, we have another example where both are correct, illustrated as follows: Any one of the three of us could be chosen to lead the team, but I don’t know why anyone would select me.

There are many other examples like those listed above, but we’ll explore them in a future blog post.

by South University
June 11, 2012
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The English Language in the 21st Century

by South University
June 4, 2012

If there's one thing you can count on where the English language is concerned, it's that it will change. For proof of this, all we need to do is look back at the prose of William Shakespeare. People certainly don’t say things like “The apparel oft proclaims the man,” these days, and if they did, they’d probably be the recipient of more than a few strange looks.

In our highly technological society, language continues to evolve even today. It’s graduation season, and the way we refer to the act of graduating seems to be in a state of flux. As Grammar Girl notes in her blog, recent history has given us three ways to say it. In the early 1900s, it was common for one to say “he was graduated from college.” By the middle of the last century, the saying morphed into “he graduated from college.” In the past few years, the statement has become more simplified still, and many people often say “he graduated college.” For more on this subject, check out Grammar Girl’s insightful blog post.

Not only are we omitting words where we feel that they are no longer needed, but we’re also making up new words that we feel do a better job of capturing what we want to say. A popular example these days is the “word” melty. If you search in any dictionary, you won’t find melty anywhere, but that hasn’t stopped the likes of popular fast food chains from using it in their ad campaigns with abandon. The thought must have been that “melty cheese” sounds so much better than “melted cheese.” It may not be a real word today, but it likely won’t take long for it to make its way into dictionaries with its frequent appearance in our everyday lives.

The evolution of language could be seen as positive or negative, but it seems to be a necessity as we progress as a society. We’re always looking for faster, better ways of living our lives, so why should language be left out of the mix?

 

by South University
June 4, 2012
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South University Online Programs Announces New Student Literary Journal

by South University
December 1, 2011

The English department at South University Online Programs is pleased to announce the launch of the new student literary journal, ASYNCHRONOUS. They are currently accepting the following from students:

  • Fiction
  • Poetry
  • Literary Non-Fiction
  • Photography
  • Art

The goal of the journal is to “provide an outlet for creative expression that cannot always be found in the classroom setting.”

“Our hope at Asynchronous is to provide South University Online students with a platform to showcase their passion and work,” says Ashley Johnson, MFA, English instructor for South University Online Programs and Asynchronous committee member. “By providing artists of all levels a vessel for their voice that can be easily shared with friends, family, and classmates, we hope to encourage emerging and established writers at South to continue to pursue their literary and artistic aspirations.”

Submissions will be accepted through February 17, 2012 from current students at South University Online Programs only.

by South University
December 1, 2011
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