South University Blog, a foundation in tradition. Education for modern times.

The South Way

A foundation in tradition.
Education for modern times.

Request info# Request info# Chat Live

South University Blog

Filter By:

  • Location
  • Area Of Study
  • nurse

Celebrate National Nurses Week With Us!

by South University
April 26, 2018
An image of several South University nursing students.  The image has the National Nurses Week 2018 logo in the right corner.  It reads nurses inspire, innovate, influence.

Nurses serve as the frontline of the American healthcare system. Registered Nurses administer patients' medications and treatments, create plans for patient care, help perform diagnostic tests, teach patients and their families how to manage illnesses and injuries and so much more.

In fact, the roles and responsibilities of these caring and compassionate healthcare providers is rapidly expanding. Advanced practice nurses perform physical examinations, diagnose and treat common illnesses and injuries, manage chronic health problems and prescribe medication.

At South University, we truly admire the hard work and dedication of the students in our nursing programs, our nursing alumni and all of the other nurses who display a steadfast commitment to the patients they help each and every day. It's an honor to offer educational opportunities to help nurses grow and make a larger impact on their patients, communities and the healthcare industry as a whole.

We're always excited to observe National Nurses Week, sponsored by the American Nurses Association (ANA), each year from May 6 to May 12. This is a time for us to acknowledge the work of these caregivers and say thank you for everything they do for us throughout the year.

National Nurses Week 2018

The 2018 theme of National Nurses Week, "Inspire, Innovate, Influence," recognizes nurses' commitment to protecting, promoting and improving health care for all. "We take pride in the fact that the public has rated nursing as the most honest and ethical profession for the past 16 years," states the ANA. "It is only fitting that we take one week each year to celebrate our profession and the vital role nurses play in health care."

Thank a Nurse

Join in the celebration this National Nurses Week and help us honor the special nurses that have touched your lives. We encourage you — our students, alumni and other community members — to participate in the festivities by recognizing or thanking a nurse on our Facebook page during National Nurses Week (May 6-May 12, 2018).

Nurses—help us honor you by sharing your story, advice and accomplishments today. We want to hear your personal story about what you've accomplished and overcome, as well as well as what's keeping you motivated to pursue your education.

by South University
April 26, 2018
READ MORE  
  • Tags:

In-Demand: More Nurse Educators Still Needed!

by South University
August 7, 2017

Nurse Educator

As the need for nurses has grown over the years, so has the need for nurse educators. Yet this need has not been met, and today nurse educator shortages at facilities across the U.S. are limiting student enrollment numbers. According to an American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) report, U.S. nursing schools turned away 75,029 qualified applicants from baccalaureate and graduate nursing programs in 2018 due to an insufficient number of faculty, clinical sites, classroom space, clinical preceptors, and budget constraints

Thus, for those considering a career in the field of nurse education, the time is right for you to build your knowledge and skills and pursue a career where you are needed!

Graduate Degrees Required for Open Positions

If you are interested in a career as a nurse educator, a graduate degree is highly recommended and valued by employers.

Historically, it has been hard for nursing schools to find nurse educators possessing master’s or doctoral degrees. In 2016, 8% of full-time nurse educator positions were unfilled, according to an AACN survey of nursing programs across the country. These open nurse educator positions leave many opportunities for individuals with the right passion, skills, and educational experiences.

More Nurse Educators Retiring in Coming Years

For institutions not currently feeling the effects of the country's nurse educator shortages, the upcoming retirement of many nurse educators may lead to even more open positions. According to AACN's report on 2016-2017 Salaries of Instructional and Administrative Nursing Faculty, the average ages of doctorally-prepared nurse faculty holding the ranks of professor, associate professor, and assistant professor were 62.4, 57.2, and 51.2 years, respectively. This means that many nurse educators will be retiring and leaving vacancies in the coming years. Experts predict that even the country’s best-rated nursing schools will need to recruit aggressively to attract the right applicants for their vacancies.

To minimize the impact of the nurse educator shortage, the American Nurses Association is working to encourage registered nurses to study for master’s and doctoral degree programs to provide them with an opportunity to move into educator positions. If you’re interested in this career, get started by learning about the graduate programs in the area of Nursing offered by South University at https://www.southuniversity.edu/areas-of-study/nursing.

Read More
http://www.aacnnursing.org/News-Information/Fact-Sheets/Nursing-Faculty-Shortage

Author's Note: This article was originally published December 2014 and has been updated to reflect current research statistics and insights.

by South University
August 7, 2017
READ MORE  
  • Tags:

South University Nursing Faculty and Staff to Attend 2017 FNPN Conference

by South University
July 25, 2017
Image of a nurse surrounded by various symbols related to nursing.

At South University, our nursing students and faculty understand the importance of lifelong learning, especially amidst the ongoing transformation of our healthcare systems, our aging US population, and the limited access to care in many communities.

In the College of Nursing and Public Health, our academic offerings can prepare you with a strong foundation and the fundamental knowledge and skills you’ll need to continue developing and evolving throughout your career. We encourage our students and faculty to be active in furthering the nursing community, and we support nursing organizations such as the Florida Nurse Practitioner Network (FNPN) that help nurses to learn from each other and encourage discussions about new nursing methods and techniques.

South University at the 2017 FNPN Conference

Through numerous workshops, training courses, and presentations, this year’s FNPN conference explores a variety of caregiving best practices as well as the many ways that the nursing community is transforming the healthcare field. Held August 10-12, 2017 at Walt Disney World Dolphin Hotel in Lake Buena Vista, FL, the conference will include keynote speeches on the future of nurse practitioners in healthcare as well as strategies for solving complex healthcare problems. Recognizing the importance of these discussions, South University will be attending the conference, with team members available to chat with attendees and discuss how our graduate programs can prepare you for this ever-evolving profession.

Among the team representing South University will be Dr. William Warrington, PhD, ARNP, FNP-C, CCRP, an accomplished nurse practitioner and educator, with over 25 years of nursing experience. Warrington is a South University Assistant Dean and Associate Professor for Graduate Nursing at the South University Orlando Learning Site. At our Orlando Learning Site, students can attend classes and meet with advisors and faculty in-person once a week, while completing their remaining coursework online or in clinical settings.

Warrington holds an MSN from Georgetown University as well as a PhD in Nursing Science / Physiology from the University of Florida. His hospital nursing experience includes time in the ICU as well as time in cardiac catheterization laboratories. Warrington has also held the title of Nurse Scientist, working for 5 years with the Center for Nursing Research, where he served as co-investigator in numerous studies and co-authored multiple peer-reviewed articles, including one published in the Journal of the Association for Vascular Access.

In addition to guiding and mentoring South University students, Warrington continues to practice at a family medicine clinic in Orlando and volunteers his time as a Nurse Practitioner for Shepherd's Hope Inc, providing free care to low-income families in need.

Stop by to see us!

Are you a nurse practicing in Florida? We hope to see you at the FNPN Conference this August, and we invite you to stop by the South University booth on Friday or Saturday to meet Dr. Warrington! In the meantime, you can explore all of our Nursing programs on our website and find South University faculty and student stories on our blog.

by South University
July 25, 2017
READ MORE  
  • Tags:

The Role of Family Nurse Practitioners in Healthcare

by South University
November 9, 2015

Navigating the world of healthcare can be tough enough without adding confusion about titles and roles. While the nurse practitioner profession continues to grow, many people aren’t familiar with what family nurse practitioners do and the services they offer. Today, we look at the role of family nurse practitioners and the care they can provide for you and your family.

What’s a Nurse Practitioner?

For those unfamiliar with the profession, nurse practitioners are healthcare providers who deliver a blend of nursing and medical care, focusing equally on treating and on educating patients.

Nurse practitioners can help patients to manage acute or long-term, chronic illnesses, and have been found to have primary care outcomes as good as or superior to those of physicians. They conduct physical exams, perform diagnostic tests and procedures, and can write prescriptions in all 50 states.

You can read more about the role of nurse practitioners in healthcare here.

What is the Role of a Family Nurse Practitioner?

Building relationships with and caring for families is at the heart of the family nurse practitioner profession. Nurse practitioners specializing in family practice can diagnose, examine, and treat patients of all ages, from childhood to adulthood, much like a family doctor.

In addition, family nurse practitioners are committed to educating patients on disease prevention and promoting positive, healthy behaviors for all developmental stages. Because nurse practitioners closely work with their patients to understand their needs, concerns, and lifestyles and to guide their patients in living healthy lifestyles, many patients find themselves able to develop trusting, familiar relationships with their family nurse practitioners.

Some family nurse practitioners work with or under physicians in private practices, while others work at community treatment centers or walk-in clinics. Although nurse practitioners’ scope of practice varies by state law, family nurse practitioners in some states may operate their own private family practices.

“We’re in the role of helping people get well and stay healthy,” explains Dr. Cherie Howk, a family nurse practitioner and faculty member at South University, Online Programs. “We’re not replacing physicians; we are augmenting that practice.”

As demand continues to grow for medical services from aging baby boomers and those newly insured by recent healthcare reform, the laws regarding independent practice for family nurse practitioners are likely to continue evolving. In medically underserved populations with a shortage of physicians, family nurse practitioners can fill an important community need and many nursing organizations support nurse practitioners gaining more professional autonomy.

“There are a lot of primary care positions that need to be filled, especially in rural areas, that aren’t being filled by physicians,” explains Dr. Howk. “Nurse practitioners are stepping up and taking care of patients in areas that don’t have primary care providers.”

What Education Do Family Nurse Practitioners Have?

All family nurse practitioners have achieved licensure and credentialing well beyond what is required to work as registered nurses (RNs). To practice, all nurse practitioners also complete a graduate education and some earn additional post graduate certificates and even doctoral degrees. Throughout their career, nurse practitioners also complete courses in support of continuing their education and growing their knowledge in the healthcare field.

To learn more about this career, find more articles about nurse practitioners on our blog, or explore our Nursing programs, including those designed to prepare students for careers as Nurse Practitioners.

South University does not guarantee third-party certification/licensure. Outside agencies control the requirements for taking and passing certification/licensing exams and are subject to change without notice to South University.

The information and opinions expressed herein represent the independent opinions and ideas of the faculty and/or staff and do not represent the opinions or ideas of South University.

Programs, credential levels, technology, and scheduling options vary by school and are subject to change. Not all online programs are available to residents of all U.S. states. Administrative office: South University, 709 Mall Boulevard, Savannah, GA 31406-4805 © 2015 South University. All rights reserved. Our email address is materialsreview@southunivers ity.edu.

See suprograms.info for program duration, tuition, fees and other costs, median debt, alumni success, and other important info.

by South University
November 9, 2015
READ MORE  
  • Tags:

A Milestone for the Nursing Community: 50 Years of Nurse Practitioners

by South University
November 2, 2015

A Milestone for the Nursing Community: 50 Years of Nurse Practitioners

For the last 50 years, nurse practitioners have provided top-notch primary, acute and specialty care to patients in need. Now, in 2015, the American Association of Nurse Practitioners (AANP) reports that more than 205,000 nurse practitioners are licensed in the US.

“The role has evolved quite a bit,” says Donna McHaney, DNP, RN, APRN, FNP-BC, an Assistant Professor and Program Director for Graduate Nursing Programs at South University, Online Programs. “We’ve been accepted in more states as primary care providers. Our role has evolved with nurse practitioners being more independent with more autonomy in our work, having our own practices, and making important contributions in the arena of primary care and patient-centered care.”

Today, as a key part of our nation’s healthcare system, nurse practitioners evaluate, diagnose and treat patients in clinics, private practices, hospitals and more. With prescription privileges in all 50 states, the average nurse practitioner in 2012 wrote 19 prescriptions a day, totaling more than 733 million prescriptions in one year. Nurse practitioners also strive to guide their patients toward healthier lifestyles through one-on-one health and disease education and counseling.

“I think the biggest hurdle for us was getting buy-in from the rest of the medical field that we can do what we’ve been trained to do, that we are good at what we’re doing, and we can provide that same quality care as they do,” she says. “Developing that trust took a long time.”

“Another hurdle has been just having access to be able to provide that care, because we have states where a lot of us still have to have collaborating physicians to practice with,” Dr. McHaney adds. “That’s still a hurdle we’re trying to overcome.”

However, numerous peer-reviewed articles have concluded that nurse practitioners provide primary care that is equivalent or superior to care provided by physicians, and their importance in healthcare continues to expand, despite some states restricting their scope of practice.

In rural communities and other medically underserved areas, nurse practitioners play an especially important role in delivering accessible primary care at a time when the population is aging and the need for care providers is growing. According to predictions from the Association of American Medical Colleges, by 2025, the nation will face a shortage of 46,000-90,000 physicians, including a shortage of 12,000-31,000 primary care physicians.

“There are a lot of people in the United States who still lack access to care,” says Dr. McHaney. “We need a lot more advanced practice nurses out there. We need them to help us continue to change healthcare and to give access to people who haven’t had access to care.”

South University is proud to have helped many nursing students prepare for careers as nurse practitioners. You can read several of their stories on our blog or learn about our programs in the College of Nursing and Public Health on our website.

To every nurse and healthcare provider, we thank you and celebrate you for your hard work and commitment to the field! As always, we remain dedicated to providing a high-quality educational experience for our students who will join you in providing care to communities and individuals across the country!

The information and opinions expressed herein represent the independent opinions and ideas of the faculty and/or staff and do not represent the opinions or ideas of South University.

The information and opinions expressed herein represent the independent opinions and ideas of the faculty and/or staff and do not represent the opinions or ideas of South University.

Programs, credential levels, technology, and scheduling options vary by school and are subject to change. Not all online programs are available to residents of all U.S. states. Administrative office: South University, 709 Mall Boulevard, Savannah, GA 31406-4805 © 2015 South University. All rights reserved. Our email address is materialsreview@southuniversity.edu.


by South University
November 2, 2015
READ MORE  
  • Tags: