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In-Demand: More Nurse Educators Still Needed!

by South University
August 7, 2017

Nurse Educator

As the need for nurses has grown over the years, so has the need for nurse educators. Yet this need has not been met, and today nurse educator shortages at facilities across the U.S. are limiting student enrollment numbers. According to an American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) report, U.S. nursing schools turned away 75,029 qualified applicants from baccalaureate and graduate nursing programs in 2018 due to an insufficient number of faculty, clinical sites, classroom space, clinical preceptors, and budget constraints

Thus, for those considering a career in the field of nurse education, the time is right for you to build your knowledge and skills and pursue a career where you are needed!

Graduate Degrees Required for Open Positions

If you are interested in a career as a nurse educator, a graduate degree is highly recommended and valued by employers.

Historically, it has been hard for nursing schools to find nurse educators possessing master’s or doctoral degrees. In 2016, 8% of full-time nurse educator positions were unfilled, according to an AACN survey of nursing programs across the country. These open nurse educator positions leave many opportunities for individuals with the right passion, skills, and educational experiences.

More Nurse Educators Retiring in Coming Years

For institutions not currently feeling the effects of the country's nurse educator shortages, the upcoming retirement of many nurse educators may lead to even more open positions. According to AACN's report on 2016-2017 Salaries of Instructional and Administrative Nursing Faculty, the average ages of doctorally-prepared nurse faculty holding the ranks of professor, associate professor, and assistant professor were 62.4, 57.2, and 51.2 years, respectively. This means that many nurse educators will be retiring and leaving vacancies in the coming years. Experts predict that even the country’s best-rated nursing schools will need to recruit aggressively to attract the right applicants for their vacancies.

To minimize the impact of the nurse educator shortage, the American Nurses Association is working to encourage registered nurses to study for master’s and doctoral degree programs to provide them with an opportunity to move into educator positions. If you’re interested in this career, get started by learning about the graduate programs in the area of Nursing offered by South University at https://www.southuniversity.edu/areas-of-study/nursing.

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http://www.aacnnursing.org/News-Information/Fact-Sheets/Nursing-Faculty-Shortage

Author's Note: This article was originally published December 2014 and has been updated to reflect current research statistics and insights.

by South University
August 7, 2017
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4 Popular Specialties to Consider for Your Nursing Career

by SouthMarketing
April 16, 2014

Registered Nurses pursuing a master’s degree will find that there is no shortage of options for specializations, from education to family practice. Here are 4 popular specialties to consider as you plan your future in nursing.

Nurse1) Nurse Practitioner

Nurse Practitioners can practice primary care or focus on more specialized areas. For example, Family Nurse Practitioners provide services to individuals across the lifespan, from infant to adult, whereas Adult Health Nurse Practitioners focus on a smaller segment of the population. As a Nurse Practitioner, your daily work may involve performing routine check-ups, examining lab results, assessing existing conditions, promoting overall health, writing prescriptions and establishing treatment plans for patients.

If you’re interested in direct patient care, a career as a Nurse Practitioner is an excellent choice, with a 34% employment growth projected by the BLS for 2012 to 2022. The majority of Nurse Practitioners work with a physician, but others maintain an independent practice. The BLS lists the 2012 median annual salary for Nurse Practitioners as $89,960.

2) Nurse Educator

Nurse Educators can have rich and rewarding careers combining clinical expertise with a passion for teaching. As a Nurse Educator, you can play a pivotal role in mentoring and shaping the future generation of nurses, preparing them to meet the challenges of the rapidly changing healthcare industry. In addition to providing training at various education levels, you may develop, evaluate and revise curricula as well as conduct research.

In 2010, according to discovernursing.com, 56% of schools had vacancies for nursing faculty. This trend continues today, as the American Association of Colleges of Nursing estimates that, last year, 80,000 capable, prospective nursing students were turned away due to a shortage of educators. According to explorehealthcareers.org, the average annual salary of a Nurse Educator is $78,242.

3) Nurse Administrator

Nurse Administrators and Managers are critical in designing healthcare delivery systems, recruiting and supervising healthcare staff, making policy and financial decisions, promoting improvements in patient care, and incorporating new technology into the delivery of care. As a Nurse Administrator, you’ll also work to optimize interactions between patients, doctors and nurses as well as to facilitate communication between departments.

As the need for RNs increases—with the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) projecting a 19% growth rate from 2012 to 2022, so does the need for people to manage this growing workforce. Thus, the BLS estimates that the employment of medical and health services managers will grow 23% from 2012 to 2022, much faster than the 11% average across all occupations, with an annual median salary of $88,580. With an education focused on nurse administration, you may be prepared to work as a patient care unit coordinator, nurse case manager, senior manager or nurse unit manager.

4) Nurse Informaticist

Individuals working in Nurse Informatics combine their nursing knowledge and communications skills with a knack for technology and information structure. As a Nurse Informaticist, you’ll have opportunities to develop, implement, manage and evaluate operational data and information systems as well as collect and analyze patient data with the goal of improving clinical care. As a trusted expert, you may also be required to communicate your findings and train other staff members in the use of these systems.

Nurse Informaticists are typically members of the information systems or technology departments at hospitals, healthcare consulting firms or research organizations. Alternatively, you may be placed in the research or education arm of your institution. According to explorehealthcareers.org, the typical salary for Nurse Informatists ranges from $79,000-$83,675. The need for these individuals is expected to increase in direct proportion to innovations in healthcare technology.

Ready to take the next step? Request information about South University and our College of Nursing and Public Health today.

For More Information...

ExploreHealthCareers.org: Nurse Educator | Nurse Practitioner | Nurse Informatics
http://www.healthcareadministration.com/becoming-a-nurse-administrator/
http://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/registered-nurses.htm
http://www.bls.gov/ooh/management/medical-and-health-services-managers.htm

by SouthMarketing
April 16, 2014
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Introducing 3 New Post Graduate Certificates in Nursing

by South University
October 21, 2013

South University is expanding our program offering in our College of Nursing and Public Health!

If you already hold a Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) degree, but you’d like to pursue a different specialization or take your career in a new direction, you can find what you need at South University. Our Post Graduate Certificate in Nursing programs can enable you to gain additional expertise and focused knowledge while continuing on a career path you’re passionate about—without having to complete another master’s degree.

Nurse

Read on to learn more about our three new programs:

Post Graduate Certificate in Nursing with a specialization in Nurse Educator

Post Graduate Certificate in Nursing with a specialization in Adult Health Nurse Practitioner

Post Graduate Certificate in Nursing with a specialization in Family Nurse Practitioner

Post Graduate Certificate in Nursing with a specialization in Nurse Educator

This 24-credit hour program includes courses in teaching and learning strategies, curriculum development, evaluation and two practicum courses. These practicum courses provide you with an opportunity to gain experience as a nurse educator in clinical and academic settings under the guidance of a more experienced instructor.

Post Graduate Certificate in Nursing with a specialization in Adult Health Nurse Practitioner

The 32-credit hour certificate program is designed to provide you with the knowledge and decision-making skills to provide direct advanced practice nursing health care services to adults (ages 18+). As a student, you’ll take courses in pharmacology, advanced health and physical assessment, gerontology, women’s health and primary care—all approached with a focus on adult health.

Post Graduate Certificate in Nursing with a specialization in Family Nurse Practitioner

The 38-credit hour certificate program is intended to prepare students to provide direct advanced practice nursing health care services to individuals across the life span. In this program, you can develop specialized skills in family practice through the study of pharmacology, advanced health and physical assessment, gerontology, women’s health, pediatrics and primary care.

Learn more about these programs by calling 1-888-444-3404! Classes start November 14, 2013 and applications are now being accepted.

See our full offering of Nursing programs here.

by South University
October 21, 2013
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Take Your Nursing Career to the Next Level

by South University, Online Programs
September 16, 2013

Becoming an RN is an important milestone in your professional journey. The next step is continuing to build your expertise. In the growing field of nursing, advancing your education can help you to distinguish yourself as a top candidate and prepare you to make a difference in the lives of your patients. The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects positions for RNs will increase by 26 percent from 2010 until 2020. Will you be ready when the next big career opportunity comes your way?

Whether you’re just starting out or you have years of experience and training under your belt, South University has a nursing degree program designed for you and your busy schedule.

Bachelor of Science in Nursing

Nurse SymbolIn our Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) program, you will have the opportunity to study advanced techniques for preventing and managing illness as well as for promoting general health and wellness. Plus, our BSN program can educate you on the basics of being a manager, including how to motivate, prioritize, delegate and make informed decisions. Thus, you can learn to not only have a more active role in your patients' health but also to be prepared to oversee LPNs and other RNs.

Master of Science Nursing

Nursing Practice symbol

When you obtain your Master of Science in Nursing (MSN), you can increase your skill and knowledge in specialized areas so that your patients get the care they deserve. If you do not yet hold a BSN, consider our accelerated RN to MSN online program, which combines the BSN and MSN curriculums.

In our MSN program, we offer two Nurse Practitioner specializations—Adult Health Nurse Practitioner and Family Nurse Practitioner. (PayScale.com notes that the average nurse practitioner earns anywhere from $67,307 to $111,234 annually.) In addition, we offer the Nurse Educator Specialization, the Nursing Informatics Specialization and the Nurse Administrator Specialization, so that you are prepared to take you careers in whatever direction you choose.

Doctor of Nursing Practice

nurse studying

If you’d like to be an agent of change in the field of the nursing and lead the next generation of nursing professionals, get started on earning your Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP). Our program is designed to provide practicing clinicians with the depth and breadth of clinical skill, leadership and clinical inquiry competencies essential to achieving excellence in advanced nursing practice.

Learn more about our full offering of Nursing programs today. Or, get to know a current student working on her MSN degree.

by South University, Online Programs
September 16, 2013
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Expert Advice on How to Address Nurse Bullying

by South University
July 30, 2013

Caring for others is at the heart of the nursing profession. However, this attitude doesn’t always carry over into workplace interactions among nurses. From journal articles to posts on nursing organization websites and in national newspapers, nurse-to-nurse bullying is a point of common concern and discussion.

To learn what our nursing students can do to recognize and address bullying, we turned to author Renee Thompson, MSN, RN, CMSRN, who explores this topic in her book “Do No Harm” Applies to Nurses Too!. Here’s a bit of our conversation with Renee (referred to as RT below).

Renee Thompson

How do you know whether someone is being a bully or just having a bad day?
RT: As nurses, we haven’t developed good coping mechanisms to deal with the stress of continuous crisis or the unpredictability and ever changing complexity of health care.

However, the difference between someone having a bad day at work and a bully is that if I lash out at you in the middle of a crisis, when the crisis is over, I’ll realize I treated you disrespectfully and apologize. A bully doesn’t apologize. A bully is someone with a repeated pattern of destructive behavior and attempts to do harm.

What do you recommend for a nurse who is a target of bullying?
RT: Nurses sometimes respond by ignoring the bullying, talking about the person behind their back, or finding a way to get them back. This is all destructive behavior. Even if we ignore it, over time, we start to internalize what bullies say about us. You start to believe them, you to start to feel bad about yourself, you start to question your competence.

Instead, start a documentation trail with objective observations about the behavior so that you can see if a pattern exists and escalate the issue if needed. Another thing to do is address the behavior as it happens. Nurses have to find a way to say “I may not know everything, but I don’t deserve to be treated this way. I need your support, not your criticism.” It can be very empowering for nurses to finally stand up to a bully.

In your experience, does bullying take place among students? What would this look like in an online classroom?
RT: Bullying can also happen online –it’s just taking place in a different format and it’s not always intentional either. Really important body languages cues are missing and messages can be misinterpreted. When you’re a student typing a post at 2am, you don’t realize how your message is coming across. When you’re tired, you don’t always have a sensor.

If you’re a student who thinks you are being bullied, it might be that you’re being sensitive, but if you’re taking offense, share it privately with another classmate or someone in a leadership position. Say, “Can you read this and give me your feedback?” to get another opinion. Always tell someone about it, and if you’re not comfortable addressing it right away, find someone who can provide you with support and advice on how to handle it the next time.

To hear more from Renee Thompson, visit http://rtconnections.com/. To learn about our nursing programs, visit http://online.southuniversity.edu/area-of-study/nursing.aspx.

by South University
July 30, 2013
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