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South University, Austin Students Serve Lunch to the Homeless

by South University
June 27, 2018
Students Maria Munoz, Alex Wiens, Timothy Terry, Roda Kassiba, Melissa Palacios, Eileen Meroneck, Moise Lambe, and Wilnelia Aviles—along with Dr. Claire Stigler, full time faculty member in Public Health, and Dr. Seena Mathew, Program Director for Public Health

Creating healthier, stronger communities and making the world a better place is the shared mission of all public health professionals. Recently, a group of South University, Austin Bachelor of Science in Public Health students demonstrated their passion for this goal by volunteering in their city.

The students had been studying how socioeconomic factors can limit access to healthcare and affordable housing, when they decided to take action and support the Carita's of Austin local community kitchen. With nearly 20% of Austin households lacking consistent and reliable access to nutritious food, the nonprofit Carita’s of Austin helps people build physical wellbeing as they transition out of homelessness.

At Carita's, the South University students hand-prepared and served a lunch that included fruit and vegetable salad, mashed potatoes, venison meatloaf, and a sweet or savory pastry to over 250 members of the homeless community in the downtown Austin area. They were also involved in creating care packages including soap, toothbrushes, toothpaste, and razors. Through volunteering, this group of passionate students has helped to provide members of the homeless community a foundation upon which individuals can work toward their goal of rebuilding their lives.

Photo: Students Maria Munoz, Alex Wiens, Timothy Terry, Roda Kassiba, Melissa Palacios, Eileen Meroneck, Moise Lambe, and Wilnelia Aviles—along with Dr. Claire Stigler, full time faculty member in Public Health, and Dr. Seena Mathew, Program Director for Public Health—participated.

by South University
June 27, 2018
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Meet Claire Stigler: An Instructor Passionate about the Art of Teaching and Healing

by South University
June 18, 2018
A photo of Dr. Claire Stigler.

Dr. Claire Stigler is an Assistant Professor in the Public Health Department at South University, Austin.

She holds an MS in Human Biology from the University of Indianapolis, where she studied paleopathology and trauma in historic skeletal populations in the Archeology and Forensics Laboratory and the Indiana Prehistory Laboratory. Fascinated by the elegance and resilience of the human form, she pursued her Doctorate in Chiropractic medicine at National University of Health Sciences and earned her degree in 2013.

Dr. Stigler has been teaching anatomy and physiology courses to Public Health and Physical Therapy Assistant students at South University, Austin since 2015. She is passionate about science and medicine and strives to share the beauty and complexity of human anatomy with each of her students. She believes that, living in a global community, we all have a responsibility to leave things in better condition than when we found then. Working in education allows her to do exactly that, as she takes every opportunity to act with compassion and lead with a generous heart to provide a positive role model for her students.

Outside of teaching, Dr. Stigler maintains a private chiropractic practice in Austin and is currently completing her Applied Clinical Nutrition certification. In all things, Dr. Stigler aims to help others create the happiest, healthiest version of their lives and achieve their optimum level of wellness in mind, body, and spirit.

Learn more about South University, Austin and our program offerings today!

by South University
June 18, 2018
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Richmond Student and Faculty Volunteers Help Feed Local Communities

by South University
June 12, 2018
A young woman volunteering in a community kitchen

Community involvement and volunteerism is a big part of who we are at South University. Our mission is to foster not only academic and professional development but also personal growth in our students. South University, Richmond's support of FeedMore Community Kitchen is an excellent example of such work.

Every holiday season, the Richmond campus hosts an annual food drive to collect canned goods and other non-perishables for FeedMore Community Kitchen, central Virginia’s primary hunger-relief organization. With a service area stretching across 34 cities and counties, FeedMore helps nearly 200,000 children, families, and seniors who struggle with hunger in Central Virginia.

To grow the university's engagement with this vital community organization, student, faculty, and staff volunteers went to work this May in the FeedMore kitchen, preparing meals and learning more about their wide-ranging programs and initiatives to fight hunger.

South University volunteers packaged over 600 meals for the Meals on Wheels program and after school programs for local schoolchildren. The Community Kitchen makes nearly 3,000 meals daily for homebound seniors, disabled neighbors, after school programs, and adult day cares. Our volunteers worked as a team to prepare the deliveries, enjoying the opportunity to join in on community efforts to provide nutritious meals to local children, families, and seniors in need.

Learn more about FeedMore by visiting https://feedmore.org/.

by South University
June 12, 2018
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5 Healthcare Degrees and Career Paths Outside Nursing

by South University
January 24, 2017

A career in healthcare isn’t only for nurses or doctors. With the U.S. Bureau of Labor & Statistics (BLS) expecting the creation of 2.3 million healthcare jobs between 2014 and 2024, you have many options for pursuing a career in healthcare. If you’re drawn to helping others and bettering your community but practicing medicine isn’t for you, below are five healthcare degrees that can prepare you for other rewarding healthcare jobs.

1. Public Health Degree

With a public health degree you can prepare for a career where you work to improve health across local, national, and global communities and to make a large-scale impact on the world.

Public health career options are diverse, with opportunities to conduct disease research, influence legislative and social policy, solve health-related problems, and develop and lead programs that promote healthy lifestyles and teach disease prevention. Job growth and salaries in the field likewise vary, according to the BLS. For example, job growth for epidemiologists (who research diseases) is projected at 6%, about as fast as the average for all occupations, whereas health educators and community health workers can expect higher job growth at 13%. In 2015, epidemiologists saw a median annual wage of $69,450, with health educators at $51,960 and community health workers at $36,300.

While a Bachelor of Science in Public Health can help you to get started in this field, some public health occupations require a Master of Public Health degree.

2. Healthcare Management Degree

Healthcare managers plan, direct, and coordinate healthcare services, with leadership and administrative duties that are critical to the health of institutions and individuals. To prepare you for this responsibility, healthcare management degree programs teach both industry-specific knowledge and foundational management competencies involving critical thinking, analysis, and decision-making.

According to the BLS, medical and health services management is a growing and financially rewarding field, with an above average job growth of 17% and a 2015 median annual wage of $94,500. While a Bachelor of Science in Healthcare Management can equip you for many positions, the BLS notes that some employers prefer individuals who also have master’s degrees.

3. Psychology Degree

Fascinated by what makes people tick? Earning a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology is the first step toward a career in psychology, or the scientific study of what drives human behavior. A bachelor’s psychology degree can prepare for you for entry-level positions in psychology—like counselor aide, therapeutic assistant, career advisor, or caseworker—or for continuing on to graduate school. Other jobs, such as psychologist or clinical counselor, require advance studies beyond an undergraduate psychology degree.

While a psychology degree can lead to many careers, the BLS predicts a 19% job growth for psychologists and reported a 2015 median annual salary of $72,580 for this position.

4. Physical Therapist Assistant Degree

A physical therapist assistant career allows you to work one-on-one with patients under a physical therapist’s supervision. In this role, you would support and train patients with therapy exercises and activities, treat patients using special equipment and procedures, and report on patient progress as you help guide them back to health.

Beyond enjoying a fulfilling career, physical therapist assistants can expect to be in demand, with the BLS projecting an impressive 41% employment growth. In terms of median annual salary, physical therapists assistants brought in $55,170 in 2015. To pursue this career, you’ll need to complete an Associate of Science in Physical Therapist Assistant degree program and fulfill state licensing requirements.

5. Occupational Therapy Assistant Degree

While physical therapy assistants typically focus on patients recovering from injuries, occupational therapy assistants specialize in helping patients build and recover skills required for daily life. Work under the guidance of an occupational therapist, occupational therapy assistants may:

  • Help children with developmental disabilities become more independent
  • Assist older adults with physical and cognitive changes
  • Teach patients how to use special equipment
  • Perform patient evaluations and support ongoing patient care

The BLS also anticipates promising growth for occupational therapy assistant careers with a 43% rise in employment. In 2015, occupational therapy assistants also reported a median salary of $57,870. If you’re interested in this rapidly growing career path, earning an Associate of Science in Occupational Therapy Assistant degree should be your first step, followed by pursuing any state licensing requirements.

Explore Your Options for Healthcare Programs at South University

With an academic tradition of excellence that’s lasted over 100 years, South University has helped to prepare thousands of students for success in the healthcare field. Here, you’ll discover over 25 campus-based and online programs that can equip you for a career in healthcare. To learn about the healthcare degrees offered in South University’s College of Health Professions, College of Nursing and Public Health, and even our College of Business (with graduate and undergraduate healthcare management degree programs), call us at 1.888.444.3404 or request information today.

by South University
January 24, 2017
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4 Ways to Improve the Public Health in Your Community for National Public Health Week

by South University
April 7, 2015
National Public Health Week logo

National Public Health Week runs from April 6-12 this year, serving as a way to bring communities from across the country together to address health issues important to our country. Sponsored by the American Public Health Association, this annual campaign places a spotlight on both local and national concerns that require year-round attention. 

You may not think your actions have much of an impact on your community as a whole, but they can. Choose a public health issue close to your heart and find a way to promote it in your local community. Here are a few ideas to get you started on making your community a better place to live!

1. Start Being Healthy at Work

Talk to your Human Resources Department to see if they would consider starting an employee wellness program or think about taking small steps like switching to healthy snacks in the break room vending machines. If an employee wellness program already exists, you may also be able to help promote it. Encourage people to take charge of their health by joining you in a morning or lunchtime workout or walking group. You might be surprised at the number of people who adopt healthier habits when given the right encouragement.

2. Volunteer at a Local Social Services Organization

Find out what non-profit organizations offer social services that contribute to the health of your community. Learn about what they do and how they operate. You’re likely to find that many of these organizations rely on the help of volunteers and that you may have a skill that would benefit their cause. By volunteering your time to one of these groups, you can help them reach more people. A small effort from you can have a huge impact on the lives of those in need!

3. Encourage Carpooling and the Use of Public Transit

According to the Environmental Protection Agency, people who live, work or go to school near a major road appear to have an increased risk and severity of health problems caused by exposure to air pollution. Alarmingly, as of 2009, the Agency estimates that more than 45 million people live within 300 feet of a highway with 4 or more lanes or an airport. Do your part to improve outdoor air quality by encouraging people you know to carpool and use public transportation. Set an example by taking the bus to work or starting a carpool group with co-workers who live in your area.

4. Pursue a Public Health Career

Want to help make our world a better place to live? If public health is something you’re really passionate about, consider making a career of it. South University offers a Master of Public Health degree program, where you can gain the skills needed to handle a wide-range of health-related issues. Request information to learn more today.


See http://ge.southuniversity.edu/programoffering/4127 for program duration, tuition, fees, and other costs, median debt, alumni success, and other important info.

by South University
April 7, 2015
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