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Career Paths

Community/Independent Pharmacy Careers:

Retail pharmacists dispense medications at drug stores or grocery stores. Some pharmacists own independent pharmacies and are able to provide more personalized care to their patients. Retail pharmacists are becoming more involved in direct patient care through such activities as counseling patients on disease states, including diabetes and hypertension, medication therapy management (MTM) and administering immunizations.

Clinical Pharmacy Careers:

Clinical pharmacists work in a hospital or in a clinic setting as part of a medical care team. They typically visit patients with a physician and help to determine which medications and doses would be most effective for each patient's condition. In addition, they facilitate clinics which provide services such as anticoagulation and disease state management. They are more involved in drug therapy initiation and management than pharmacists in some other settings.

Long-term care:

Long-term care facilities are homes where ongoing care is provided to the elderly or incapacitated individuals who are not in need of acute medical care but who are unable to care for themselves. Pharmacists in this setting review the medications of the patients living in these homes and provide recommendations to the providers of care.

Nuclear Pharmacy Careers:

Nuclear pharmacists are responsible for measuring and delivering the radioactive materials which are used in digital imaging (MRI, CT, etc.) and other procedures in medical offices and hospitals. Due to the nature of the radioactive materials and how they are handled, nuclear pharmacists are typically required to start each work day very early, sometimes pre-dawn, as the radioactive materials must be delivered within a few hours of their use, or they lose their effectiveness.

Home infusion:

These pharmacists are responsible for preparing intravenous medications for patients requiring such products as antibiotics, parenteral nutrition, or chemotherapy.

Academia:

Pharmacists are an integral part of the faculty in Colleges and Schools of Pharmacy. In this setting, pharmacists are responsible for didactic teaching of clinical pharmacy courses and also serve as preceptors for students completing rotations, giving them the opportunity to observe clinical pharmacy activities.

Pharmaceutical Industry:

Pharmacists are often employed by companies within the pharmaceutical industry to provide drug information, in depth information to healthcare providers, or facilitate clinical trials.

Pharmacy Management:

Pharmacy District and Regional Managers supervise teams of pharmacy managers and staff pharmacists within a retail chain.

This list only represents a sample of the many practice opportunities that are available to pharmacists.

http://www.southuniversity.edu/columbia/areas-of-study/pharmacy/pharmacy-doctor-of-pharmacy-pharmd/careerpaths